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SEI in the Media: Alana Mann in The Conversation on Why Eating is Unavoidably Political

Dr Mann explains how the world’s citizens need to intervene as democratic publics to transform a broken food system.

Dr Alana Mann, Senior Lecturer and Key Researcher of the Food, People and the Planet node, has contributed an article to the Conversation on the global issue of how the food production system is inherently undemocratic. Dr Mann looks at how the world’s citizens need to intervene as democratic publics to transform a broken system.

Calls for food democracy, which date back to the sustainable agriculture movement of the 1980s, have become more common with the increasing concentration of power in the global industrial food regime.

The current regime is inherently undemocratic. The intervention of democratic food publics – based on their shared experiences of the adverse effects of global foodways – is essential to transform a broken system.

This political project depends on recognition that this is a global public problem and that its solutions depend on new conceptions of citizenship.

 

Read the full article on the Conversation Australia