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Welcome to Irene Fagotto, SEI’s First Intern

Irene will be interning for our upcoming events in February and March.

SEI welcomes Irene Fagotto, who will be interning with us throughout the semester.

Irene Fagotto is a third-year student of Political Science at Sciences Po Paris currently in exchange at the University of Sydney. Before her university studies, she lived in Italy and participated in long terms exchanges in Germany and China. Irene is the former co-president and treasurer of her university’s Model United Nations Association, for which she organised last year’s MUN simulation. She also is very experienced in debating, has chaired multiple committees in various international simulations and has won multiple awards as a delegate.

IRENE-NEWS

 

Read more about Irene below, where we ask her about her environmental interests and what drew her to intern with us.


What made you interested in interning with SEI? 

First of all, I have had the pleasure to take a class with Professor Schlosberg, through which I found out about this institution and the importance of its projects and events. At the same time, I have always been interested in the environment in various ways, from the politics of climate conferences to the effects of our diet on the changes in weather conditions, going through the arguments against climate skeptics. Interning at SEI would mean to help with the events, which is what I have done on various occasions in the past. All in all the three things combined perfectly, and here I am!

What are the environmental issues or problems that most interest you?

What interests me academically is a field that I have not explored very much yet, which is the theory that merges Political Economy and the environment. I have studied a lot of economic theory and even if I explored alternative economic theories, there are not many scholars that engage comprehensively with the role of our changing environment in our current economic system. I will try to explore this issue during my next semester at the University of Sydney.

How do you do your bit for the environment?

When I was a kid, I started engaging with the environment as a member of WWF Italy, “saving animals and their environment” around Italy. Later on, I have participated in recycling projects with my middle school and high school. I have also engaged in group projects concerning the involvement of civil society in environmental decisions within one of my environmental politics courses. As for now, I would say that try my best to be and informed consumer in every aspect of my life, from transportation to food. Talking about food, I have chosen to stop being vegetarian a couple of years ago, but I  keep controlling my diet and try to engage in discussions with others about it. In my home country, it’s very difficult to talk about alternative food because of our strong culinary tradition, but I have kept on annoying my close family friends and made them eat much less meat, which does not sound heroic but believe me, it is!

You are an exchange student. Where were you before Sydney? And how are you enjoying your time here?

Since I was 14 years old, I have had the chance to travel a lot and live by myself in different countries: I have called various places in Italy and then Germany, France and China home. But none of these countries has been as welcoming as Australia and its people. I absolutely love it here and if it would not be as far from home, I would definitely consider moving here for good.