Collaboration in Practice

Difference, Dissent and Trust – Killian Quigley and Astrida Neimanis

This is the first instalment of the Collaboration in Practice series that explores collaborations across disciplines, careers and outside the academy. Dr Killian Quigley, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Sydney Environment Institute, sits down with Dr Astrida Neimanis, Interdisciplinary Coordinator in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney. They share their impressions of how collaborative work engages difference, dissent, trust and so on.

 

 

Timestamps

01:25   Defining Different Kinds of Interdisciplinary Collaborations
03:10   Respecting Differences
05:25   Dissent
07:55   Power Hierarchies
10:35   Trust and Respect

Speakers

Killian Quigley, Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney
Astrida Neimanis, Department of Gender and Cultural Studies, University of Sydney


Further Readings

Chen, Mel Y. Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2012.

Stengers, Isabelle. Cosmopolitics I. London and Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Tironi, Manuel. “Dissenting”, in Routledge Handbook of Interdisciplinary Research Methods, edited by Celia Lury, Rachel Fensham, Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, Sybille Lammes, Angela Last, Mike Michael and Emma Uprichard, pp.291-5. London and New York: Routledge, 2018.


Merging Academic and Artistic Worlds – Michelle St Anne and Megan MacKenzie

This is the second instalment of the Collaboration in Practice series that explores collaborations across disciplines, careers and outside the academy. Michelle St Anne, Deputy Director of the Sydney Environment Institute and Artistic Director of The Living Room Theatre, sits down with Megan MacKenzie, Professor of Gender and War in the Department of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney. They detail their collaborative work which spans across academic and artistic practices and discuss how disagreement can be the sign of effective collaboration, about the importance of creating safe spaces within a collaborative relationship, about how collaborators find one another in the first place and a great deal more.

 

 

Timestamps

01:25   Origins of an Artistic and Academic Collaboration
06:55   When to Relinquish Control?
10:55   Importance of Dissent and Disagreement

Speakers

Killian Quigley, Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney
Michelle St Anne, Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney and The Living Room Theatre
Megan MacKenzie, Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney


Further Readings

Celermajer, Danielle., MacKenzie, Megan. & Ricketson, Damien. (2020) “Sites of Violence: Invisibility, Responsibility and Resonance”Sydney Environment Institute, published 18 June 2020.

Celermajer, Danielle., Quigley, Killian. & Winter, Christine. (2019) “(Re)Composing the Self: A Collaborative Reflection”Sydney Environment Institute, published 15 April 2019.

Herrigel, Eugen. Zen in the Art of Archery, Berlin, Germany: Konstanz, 1948.

MacKenzie, Megan. Beyond the Band of Brothers: The US Military and the Myth that Women Can’t Fight. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press, 2015.

Nachmanovitch, Stephen. Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art. New York, United States of America: Penguin Publishing Group, 1991.

Norgaard, Kari Marie. Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions, and Everyday Life. Cambridge, United States of America: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2011.

Rebstock, Matthias. & Roesner, David. Composed Theatre: Aesthetics, Practices, Processes. Chicago, United States of America: The University of Chicago Press, 2012.

St Anne, Michelle. (2020) “Sites of Violence: Threads of Home and Compositional Thinking”Sydney Environment Institute, published 28 May 2020.

Stanislavski, Constantin. An Actor Prepares. 1936.


Curation, Material Culture and Indigenous Knowledges – Leah Lui-Chivizhe and Jude Philp

This is the third instalment of the Collaboration in Practice series that explores collaborations across disciplines, careers and outside the academy. Dr Killian Quigley, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Sydney Environment Institute, sits down with Dr Leah Lui-Chivizhe, historian and curator, and Dr Jude Philp, Senior Curator of the Macleay Collections at the Chau Chak Wing Museum. They share insights into their long-working relationship that spans curation, history, material culture and indigenous knowledges. They talk about the importance of openness, advocacy, place and so forth.

 

 

Timestamps

01:35   Developing a Collaborative Relationship
06:35   Trust and Power Dynamics Between PhD Supervisor and Student
09:50   Disagreements Reveal New Opportunities
11:25   Timing and Long-Term Collaborations

Speakers

Killian Quigley, Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney
Leah Lui-Chivizhe, Department of History, University of Sydney
Jude Philp, Chau Chak Wing Museum, University of Sydney


Further Readings

Stuffed, Stitched Studied: Taxidermy in the 19th Century – was a 2015 exhibition at the Macleay Museum that featured Leah’s work.

David, Frank., Lui-Chivizhe, Leah. & Philp, Jude. (2015) “Individuals in Kulkalgal History”, Journal of Australian Studies, vol.29. no.3, pp.290-306, DOI: 10.1080/14443058.2015.1051086

Lui-Chivizhe, Leah. “Telling Torres Strait History Through Turtle”, in Curating the Future: Museums, Communities and Climate Change, edited by Jennifer Newell, Libby Robin, Kirsten Wehner, pp.118-127. New York: Routledge, 2017.

Philp, Jude. (2015) “Krar: Nineteenth Century Turtle-Shell Masks from Mabuyag Collected by Samuel McFarlane”, Memoirs of the Queensland Museum: Cultural Heritage Series, vol.8, no.1, pp.99-125.


Confronting Environmental Crises with Strategic Urgency – Susan Park and Madeline Taylor

This is the fourth instalment of the Collaboration in Practice series that explores collaborations across disciplines, careers and outside the academy. Dr Killian Quigley, Postdoctoral Researcher at the Sydney Environment Institute, sits down with Susan Park, Professor of Global Governance in the Department of Government and International Relations and Dr Madeline Taylor, Lecturer in Law at the University of Sydney. Both unpack the recent successes and challenges of their new collaborative relationship that has been inspired by an urgent environmental and social crisis of the proposed Narrabri Gas Project. They talk teamwork, hierarchies, complementary knowledge and a great deal more.

 

 

Timestamps

01:25   United Under Urgency – Narrabri Gas Project
05:45   Navigating the Practicalities of Collaboration
07:20   Managing Disciplinary Identities
11:35   Challenges in Collaborative Work

Speakers

Killian Quigley, Sydney Environment Institute, University of Sydney
Susan Park, Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney
Madeline Taylor, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney


Further Readings

Bourne, Greg., Currell, Matthew., Fiedler, Tanya., Lawrence, Rebecca., Park, Susan., Pelle, Nathaniel., Taylor, Madeline., Viney, Gemma. & Ziller, Alison. Submission to the Independent Planning Commission on the Proposed Narrabri Gas Project, Sydney Environment Institute, 2020.

Lawrence, Rebecca., Park, Susan. & Taylor, Madeline. (2020) “What’s at Stake in Approving the Narrabri Gas Project?”Sydney Environment Institute, published 6 August 2020.

Taylor, Madeline. (2020) “COVID-19 and Renewable Energy: Australia’s Golden Opportunity”, Sydney Environment Institute, published 19 June 2020.

Viney, Gemma. (2020) “Environmental Injustice: Social Impacts of the Narrabri Gas Project”Sydney Environment Institute, published 29 September 2020.

Ziller, Alison. (2020) “Salt in the Wound: Social Impacts, Public Health and the Narrabri Gas Project”Sydney Environment Institute, published 14 August 2020.

Ziller, Alison., Viney, Gemma. & Lawrence, Rebecca. (2020) “The Unexpected Impact of COVID-19 on Social Impact Assessment”Sydney Environment Institute, published 22 October 2020.